The Two-Fold Struggle: African American Republican Women’s Clubs

By Ve’Amber D. Miller – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019.  “However much the white women of the country need suffrage, for many reasons which will immediately occur to you, colored women need it more,” Mary Church Terrell wrote, encouraging black women to vote for the Republican ticket [1]. African American women … Continue reading The Two-Fold Struggle: African American Republican Women’s Clubs

Agnes Nestor – Working Women’s Advocate

By Scarlett Andes – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019.             Agnes Nestor, a prominent labor leader and educator, stands out as an unusual contributor to the fight for women’s suffrage in Illinois, which she saw as directly tied to working women’s interests. Born in 1876 in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Agnes Nestor … Continue reading Agnes Nestor – Working Women’s Advocate

Making the World Better: Lucy Stone

By Erin Witt – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019.  “From the first years to which my memory stretches, I have been a disappointed woman” [1]. This was how Lucy Stone began an 1848 speech and how she also began her political life. Early on, Stone saw the differences in the way … Continue reading Making the World Better: Lucy Stone

Elizabeth Boynton Harbert

By Davis Stubblefield – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019. When people think about the major figures of the Suffrage movement, several names immediately spring to mind: Susan B. Anthony, Jane Addams, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Elizabeth Cady Stanton. For Illinois, and particularly Evanston and the Chicago area, another name should be just … Continue reading Elizabeth Boynton Harbert

The Founding of the National Woman’s Party

By Casey Terry - Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019. Women at the founding of the National Woman's Party at the Blackstone Theater, 1916. Chicago Daily Tribune (1872-1922), Jun 06, 5. One of the most important groups formed in the U.S. to fight for women’s political rights was the National Woman’s Party. … Continue reading The Founding of the National Woman’s Party

Suffer Not the Rain: The 1916 Suffrage Parade in Chicago

By Lucas Bensley - Loyola University Chicago, PhD in History, Fall 2019 On the afternoon of June 7, 1916, 5,000 women marched through a torrential rainstorm to the Republican National Convention site in downtown Chicago. Their goal: to compel the delegates of the Grand Old Party to add a woman’s suffrage plank to the party platform. … Continue reading Suffer Not the Rain: The 1916 Suffrage Parade in Chicago

1914 Suffrage Parade: Celebration and Call to Action

By Miranda Ridener - Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019 On May 2, 1914 women and men took to the Chicago streets to parade in support of woman’s suffrage. The Illinois Equal Suffrage Association organized the parade under Grace Wilbur Trout’s presidency. The parade highlighted the national suffrage movement and coincided with … Continue reading 1914 Suffrage Parade: Celebration and Call to Action

The Women’s Suffrage Movement and the “Good Roads” Movement

By Dana Gordon - Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019 Today, Americans take roads for granted as they commute to their destinations. In Illinois, the Interstate system and U.S. Route system currently create a web of steady automobile traffic throughout the state. What about the history of the Illinois roads themselves? There … Continue reading The Women’s Suffrage Movement and the “Good Roads” Movement

Highland Park Suffrage History

by Leslie Cole, member League of Women Voters of Highland Park/Highwood The Ossoli Club of Highland Park started in the rooms of the Highland Park Club House in 1894.  Originally known as “The Monday Club, “the organization settled on the name Ossoli in honor of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, a 19th Century American journalist, women’s rights activist … Continue reading Highland Park Suffrage History

“For the future benefit of my whole race”: Ida B. Wells and the Alpha Suffrage Club

By Rachel Madden - Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019. On March 3rd, 1913, a commotion arose outside the White House. A parade of 5,000 suffragists marched up Pennsylvania Avenue, hoping to draw the attention of Woodrow Wilson, whose presidential inauguration was scheduled for the following day [1]. However, thousands of people … Continue reading “For the future benefit of my whole race”: Ida B. Wells and the Alpha Suffrage Club