Women’s Suffrage in Decatur, Illinois

By Mark W. Sorensen Note: This guest essay comes to us from Mark Sorensen whose 2004 essay “AHEAD OF THEIR TIME: A brief history of woman suffrage in Illinois,” https://www.lib.niu.edu/2004/ih110604half.html provided the foundations for the research and work of this website. Thanks Mark for all your work to save and tell the Illinois suffrage story! … Continue reading Women’s Suffrage in Decatur, Illinois

Municipal Charter Reform in Chicago: Civic Duty, Women’s Role, and Women’s Suffrage

By Joan Linsenmeier, Evanston Women's History Project Research Volunteer. The Cities and Villages Act adopted by Illinois in 1872 specified how city governments could be structured, the actions they could take, and what powers were retained by the state. Many Chicagoans opposed this act. Chicago was much larger than other Illinois cities, more diverse, and … Continue reading Municipal Charter Reform in Chicago: Civic Duty, Women’s Role, and Women’s Suffrage

The National Woman’s Party In Chicago

Two important moments in National Woman's Party (NWP) history took place in Chicago in the early years of its existence, in addition to its founding in the city. This was partly because Illinois had given its women the right to vote on a select group of elections, including presidential elections, in 1913. With its large … Continue reading The National Woman’s Party In Chicago

The 1913 Suffrage Parade in Washington D.C. – An Illinois Perspective

By: EWHP 2020 Intern Annie Cebrzynski and EWHP Director Lori Osborne In 1913, the National American Woman’s Suffrage Association (NAWSA) announced a suffrage “procession” or parade to coincide with the March 4th inauguration of President Woodrow Wilson. The parade would take place the day before and the parade’s purpose, as stated in the official program, … Continue reading The 1913 Suffrage Parade in Washington D.C. – An Illinois Perspective

The Vote on American Experience

One hundred years after the passage of the 19th Amendment, American Experience's "The Vote" tells the dramatic story of the hard-fought campaign waged by American women for the right to vote, a transformative cultural and political movement that resulted in the largest expansion of voting rights in U.S. history. It brings to life the unsung leaders of the … Continue reading The Vote on American Experience

All Citizens: a new documentary

The Lombard Historical Society (LHS) and Tim Frakes Productions Inc. announced the premier and showings of a new documentary - All Citizens: The Lombard Women who Voted 29 Years Before the 19th Amendment and the Story of Those Who Made it Possible. All Citizens is a reenactment of the day that Lombard women made history and voted on April … Continue reading All Citizens: a new documentary

Voting Was Only the Beginning for American Women

By Jennifer Duvall – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019.  Mrs. George Welles demonstrating with other suffragists in Chicago, Illinois, before going to Washington, DC, to participate in a suffrage demonstration on March 3, 1913. DN-0060283, Chicago Sun-Times/Chicago Daily News collection, Chicago History Museum. In March of 1919, the United States was … Continue reading Voting Was Only the Beginning for American Women

The Illinois WCTU and Suffrage

By Matthew Norvell – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019.  The women’s suffrage movement and the temperance movement were two of the largest reform campaigns of the Progressive Era. Although at first glance these two political movements appear to have had little reason for crossover, they were in fact closely related. To … Continue reading The Illinois WCTU and Suffrage

The Two-Fold Struggle: African American Republican Women’s Clubs

By Ve’Amber D. Miller – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019.  “However much the white women of the country need suffrage, for many reasons which will immediately occur to you, colored women need it more,” Mary Church Terrell wrote, encouraging black women to vote for the Republican ticket [1]. African American women … Continue reading The Two-Fold Struggle: African American Republican Women’s Clubs

Agnes Nestor – Working Women’s Advocate

By Scarlett Andes – Loyola University Chicago, Masters in Public History Program, Fall 2019.             Agnes Nestor, a prominent labor leader and educator, stands out as an unusual contributor to the fight for women’s suffrage in Illinois, which she saw as directly tied to working women’s interests. Born in 1876 in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Agnes Nestor … Continue reading Agnes Nestor – Working Women’s Advocate